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Trends in Depressive Symptoms and Associated Factors During Residency, 2007 to 2019. A Repeated Annual Cohort Study; Interns Are Increasingly Using Mental Health Services, but More Can Still Be Done

Increasing concern about the mental health of physicians in training has led to changes in work hour regulations and residency training programs. This study examined trends in depressive symptoms before and during the first year of residency over a 13-year period and found increased prevalence of risk factors for depression, a decrease in depressive symptoms, and an increase in interns with depression seeking treatment. The accompanying editorial discusses what should be done to address the mental health of physicians in training.

Use this article and editorial to:

  • Did you find the trends observed in this study to be expected or unexpected?
  • Review resources available to physicians in training who are experiencing burnout or depression.
  • Think about the appropriate course of action you should take if you are concerned about depression or suicidal thoughts in yourself or a colleague.
  • Review the American College of Physicians' well-being resources for residents and medical students.

Annals of Internal Medicine is the premier internal medicine academic journal published by the American College of Physicians (ACP). It is one of the most widely cited and influential specialty medical journals in the world.

Back to the May 2022 issue of ACP IMpact