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Association Between Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Decline in Function, Cognition, and Mental Health After Critical Illness Among Older Adults. A Cohort Study; Health Equity and Critical Care Survivorship: Where Do We Go From Here?

This study analyzed data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study to evaluate the association between dual eligibility status for Medicare and Medicaid and decline in function, cognition, and mental health after an intensive care unit hospitalization and concluded that socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with worse outcomes after critical illness. The accompanying editorial calls for study of the biological mechanisms underlying post–intensive care deficits, the effectiveness of various approaches to care delivery after critical illness, and supports for survivors that are effective and equitable.

Use this article and the editorial to:

  • Have you observed socioeconomic disparities in how patients fare after critical illness?
  • What are the potential reasons for these disparities?
  • Think about interventions before, during, and after critical illness episodes that have the potential to reduce the observed disparities.

Annals of Internal Medicine is the premier internal medicine academic journal published by the American College of Physicians (ACP). It is one of the most widely cited and influential specialty medical journals in the world.

Back to the July 2022 issue of ACP IMpact