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Prevention and Initial Management of HIV Infection

Although eradication of HIV infection remains an elusive goal, there have been meaningful improvements in our ability to prevent HIV infection and to manage patients who have been infected. For example, new drug combinations have been developed for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV infection and transmission, which means that more emphasis is being placed on prevention. In addition, a new rapid test is available for screening. Moreover, the preferred drug combinations for people newly diagnosed with HIV have changed. This article provides updated information about how clinicians should use these and other changes when managing their patients who are at risk for or newly diagnosed with HIV infection.

Use this article to:

  • Have you seen the presentation of acute HIV infection? Many younger physicians have never seen a case.
  • Do you have any patients who are on PrEP. If not, do you have patients who would be good candidates for it?
  • Review the currently available PrEP regimens. This cost-effectiveness analysis provides a comparison of the costs of older oral regimens versus newer long-acting injectable regimens.
  • What are the barriers to PrEP? This Annals Graphic Medicine article may be helpful.
  • Review criteria for starting HIV treatment, the regimens that are currently available, and the recommended follow-up for patients taking HIV antiretroviral therapy.
  • Test your knowledge by completing the quiz that accompanies the article and then reviewing the correct answers.

Back to the August 2022 issue of ACP IMpact