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American College of Physicians celebrates National Internal Medicine Day

ACP recognizes the contributions of internal medicine physicians to patient care

Philadelphia, October 22, 2019 – The American College of Physicians (ACP) has officially established National Internal Medicine Day on the National Day Calendar, which will be celebrated on October 28 each year. This day recognizes internal medicine specialists and subspecialists who are united by a commitment to excellence and who make a difference in the lives of their patients every day.

“The American College of Physicians is proud to represent internal medicine physicians and related subspecialists who help to prevent, diagnose, and treat illnesses that affect adults throughout their lives,” said ACP President Robert M. McLean, MD, MACP. “ACP encourages internal medicine doctors everywhere to celebrate their profession by expressing why they are proud to be an internist, recognizing a colleague, thanking a mentor, or telling their story.”

National Internal Medicine Day is part of ACP’s ongoing I.M. Proud campaign (#IMProud) to reinforce a sense of pride in internal medicine as a career. To help internal medicine physicians celebrate the day, ACP has downloadable materials and shareable social media content available at www.acponline.org/NIMDay. The hashtag for National Internal Medicine Day is #NationalInternalMedicineDay.

ACP’s Council of Early Career Physicians, Council of Resident/Fellow Members, and Council of Student Members are cohosting a Twitter chat (#NIMdayChat) on October 28 at 8:00 p.m. ET. ACP also is running radio ads in Chicago, Philadelphia, and New York City as part of the campaign.

Internal medicine physicians, or internists, are specialists who apply scientific knowledge and clinical expertise to the diagnosis, treatment, and compassionate care of adults across the spectrum from health to complex illness. Some internists take additional training to subspecialize in a more focused area of internal medicine, such as cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, rheumatology, and infectious disease.

Internists are especially well qualified to care for patients with complex conditions or multi-system diseases. They are sometimes referred to as the "doctor's doctor," because they are often called upon to act as consultants to other physicians to help solve puzzling diagnostic problems. Internists practice in a variety of settings, including private practices, clinics, and hospitals. They also conduct research, teach in medical schools and residency programs, and hold administrative positions in medical, corporate, or government settings.

Internists are recognized as pioneers in medicine, and have contributed important milestones in the evolution of patient care and advancements in research, diagnosis, care and treatment. Notable internists include Nobel Prize winners and other internal medicine specialists and subspecialists recognized for advancements such as inventing  dialysis, developing the first cardiac risk index,  cholesterol synthesis, research on peptic ulcer disease, and for holding leadership roles at national and federal government institutes, centers, and agencies.

About the American College of Physicians
The American College of Physicians is the largest medical specialty organization in the United States with members in more than 145 countries worldwide. ACP membership includes 159,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students. Internal medicine physicians are specialists who apply scientific knowledge and clinical expertise to the diagnosis, treatment, and compassionate care of adults across the spectrum from health to complex illness. Follow ACP on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.