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ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine Hold First Virtual Monkeypox Forum for Physicians

Expert panel provides practical advice on prevention and screening in clinical practice

PHILADELPHIA, October 17, 2022 – The American College of Physicians (ACP) and Annals of Internal Medicine hosted a virtual forum where expert panelists discussed the current wave of monkeypox in the U.S. and how clinicians can best treat and test for the virus while stressing that education has helped those at risk avoid contracting monkeypox. Held on October 11, the forum, Monkeypox: Challenging Clinical Questions, was the first on the subject hosted by ACP and Annals of Internal Medicine. A full recording of the forum is available for replay here and is published in Annals of Internal Medicine along with commentary from ACP Executive Vice President and CEO, Darilyn V. Moyer, MD, FACP,  Annals Editor in Chief, Christine Laine, MD, MPH, and Annals deputy editor Deborah Cotton, MD, MPH.

The program began with the presentation of three patient clinical scenarios. After polling the participants about what they would do in each case, the panelists shared their own approaches and answered attendee questions about monkeypox testing, vaccines and current treatments.

“The forum provided physicians with important information needed to address an infection that most of us have not previously encountered in a clinical setting,” said Ryan Mire, MD, MACP, ACP president. “We encourage everyone to watch the full video replay, as well-informed clinicians will be the best defense against this newly endemic infectious disease.”

In addition to the scenarios, the panelists discussed the current status of monkeypox infection in the U.S., an encouraging decline in reported numbers of cases, available vaccines and the belief that education about the virus in the community has contributed to some control of its spread.

"When COVID-19 emerged, clinicians faced a global pandemic with an empty toolbox," said Dr. Laine. “The good news about monkeypox is that we already have an approved vaccine and an effective antiviral agent in our arsenal. By keeping abreast of the science through forums such as this one, we have what we need to save lives, reduce illness, and keep an emerging disease from becoming a pandemic.”

Moderating the forum was Deborah Cotton, MD, MPH, Deputy Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine and Professor of Medicine Emerita at the Boston University Chobanian and Avedisian School of Medicine. The forum panelists included:

  • Roy M. Gulick, MD, MPH, the Rochelle Belfer Professor in Medicine and Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Weill Medical College of Cornell University and attending physician at the New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. Dr. Gulick currently conducts clinical research, sees patients with infectious diseases, and teaches medicine. 
  • Stuart N. Isaacs, MD, infectious disease specialist and a tenured Associate Professor of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine and completed his residency at Temple University Hospital. He did a research fellowship in molecular virology at the NIH in the Laboratory of Viral Diseases and completed a clinical ID fellowship at the Tufts-New England Medical Center.
  • Cassandra M. Pierre, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor at the Boston university School of Medicine, the Medical Director of Public Health Programs and the Associate Hospital Epidemiologist at Boston Medical Center and the Chair of the Diversity and Inclusion Council. Supported by state and local public health agencies, the Public Health Programs provide resources for HIV, HCV and STI prevention, linkage to care and management throughout the hospital.

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About the American College of Physicians
The American College of Physicians is the largest medical specialty organization in the United States with members in more than 145 countries worldwide. ACP membership includes 160,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students. Internal medicine physicians are specialists who apply scientific knowledge and clinical expertise to the diagnosis, treatment, and compassionate care of adults across the spectrum from health to complex illness. Follow ACP on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

 

About Annals of Internal Medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine is the flagship journal of the American College of Physicians (ACP). Annals is the most widely read and cited general internal medicine journal and one of the most influential peer-reviewed clinical journals in the world. Annals’ mission is to promote excellence in medicine, enable physicians and other health care professionals to be well-informed members of the medical community and society, advance standards in the conduct and reporting of medical research, and contribute to improving the health of people worldwide. New content is published every Tuesday at Annals.org. Follow Annals on Twitter and Instagram @AnnalsofIM and on Facebook.

ACP Media Contact: Andrew Hachadorian, (215) 351-2514, AHachadorian@acponline.org
Annals Media Contact: Angela Collom, (215) 351-2653, ACollom@acponline.org