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Annals of Internal Medicine In the Clinic

In the Clinic is a monthly feature in Annals of Internal Medicine introduced in January 2007 that focuses on practical management of patients with common clinical conditions. It offers evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions about screening, prevention, diagnosis, therapy, and patient education and provides physicians with tools to improve the quality of care.

Celiac Disease

Gluten-related disorders, including celiac disease, wheat allergy, and nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), are increasingly reported worldwide. Celiac disease is caused by an immune-mediated reaction to ingested gluten in genetically susceptible persons. NCGS is largely a diagnosis of exclusion when other causes of symptoms have been ruled out. All patients with celiac disease should be referred to a registered dietitian nutritionist with expertise in celiac disease and a gastroenterologist who specializes in celiac disease and malabsorptive disorders, and they should remain on a strict gluten-free diet indefinitely. This article provides an overview of gluten- and wheat-related disorders.

Read this issue of In the Clinic. All ACP members have full access to this content.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is very common but is frequently undiagnosed. Symptoms include loud snoring, nocturnal awakening, and daytime sleepiness. Motor vehicle accidents due to drowsy driving are a particular concern. Evaluation and treatment should focus on symptomatic patients, both to alleviate symptoms and to potentially decrease cardiovascular risk. In recent years, a strategy of home sleep apnea testing followed by initiation of autotitrating continuous positive airway pressure therapy in the home has greatly reduced barriers to diagnosis and treatment and has also facilitated routine management of OSA by primary care providers.

Read this issue of In the Clinic. All ACP members have full access to this content.

Back to the January 2020 issue of ACP Global