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Racial Health Disparities, Prejudice and Violence

Background

African-Americans and other minorities are subject to prejudice and discrimination in our society that has an immense negative impact on their health. African-Americans in particular are at risk of being subjected to discrimination and violence against them because of their race, endangering them and even costing them their lives. Racial and ethnic minorities are less likely to have access to health care than people who are white. Further, even when controlling for issues with access to care they tend to receive poorer quality care. We know that prejudice, discrimination, and violence disproportionately harm the health and well-being of racial and ethnic communities.

Where We Stand

The American College of Physicians is committed to combatting racial disparities that affect health and health care. This includes fighting the prejudice at the root of the problem, as well as the discrimination, inequities, violence and hate crimes that result from that prejudice. Racial disparities, discrimination, harassment and violence are public health issues. Evidence-based solutions are needed to combat the stressors that disproportionately harm racial and ethnic communities.

ADVOCACY SPOTLIGHT

Internists “Gravely Concerned” About Discrimination and Violence by Public Authorities and Others

African-Americans in particular are at risk of being subjected to discrimination and violence against them because of their race, endangering them and even costing them their lives. This should never be acceptable and those responsible must be held accountable. ACP has long held that hate crimes, prejudice, discrimination, harassment and violence against any person based on race, ethnicity, religion, gender, gender identity, sex, sexual orientation, or country of origin is a public health issue.


Internal Medicine Unites Against Racism

ACP members from across the country have joined in expressing the importance of racial justice and equity in healthcare by participating in rallies to draw attention to the cause.

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Latest Advocacy Efforts


Search the ACP Policy Library

To access everything ACP has said related to racial health disparities, search ACP's library of policy statements, copies of testimony, and letters to government and non-government officials.

Search the Policy Library

Racial Health Disparities

Additional Advocacy Efforts

  • ACP Comments on 2020 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) Final 2/28/2020