You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

You are using an outdated browser.

To ensure optimal security, this website will soon be unavailable on this browser. Please upgrade your browser to allow continued use of ACP websites.

You are here

December 2021

ACP IMpact

Feature

Learning to Accept Uncertainty in Medicine

(from the Sept 2021 ACP Hospitalist)

Hospitalists often have to make decisions in the face of clinical uncertainty, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. But their tolerance of uncertainty varies and may influence their well-being, a study found.


I.M. Internal Medicine

Spotlight: Michelle Sibille Senechalle, MD, CMQ, FACP

Read the advice that Dr. Sibille Senechalle wishes she had received as a medical student.


ACP Council of Student Members (CSM) Spotlight

Setting the Bar High

Medical students are known to be high-achieving individuals. However, Sam Grewe has been reaching a different type of height outside the classroom.


Medical Student Perspective

Facing the Unknown

In September 2019, I helped care for a man with a possible diagnosis of tuberculosis. While I walked into his room wearing an N95 respirator mask, his four young children entered in ill-fitting medical masks.


Advocacy Update

Changes to PSLF Program May Enable More Young Physicians to Serve in Governmental, Nonprofit Settings

(from the Nov. 5, 2021 ACP Advocate)

The U.S. Department of Education released executive actions in early October to ease the application and approval process for borrowers who want to take advantage of the federal Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, which helps students attend medical school and makes it possible for young physicians to serve in governmental and nonprofit settings.

Read the full article in ACP Advocate.

The ACP Advocate is a bi-weekly e-newsletter that provides ACP members with news about public policy issues affecting internal medicine and patient care.


Analyzing Annals

Disparate Impact: How Colorblind Policies Exacerbate Black–White Health Inequities

This commentary uses illustrative examples in clinical practice, financing policies, and COVID-19 vaccination policies to show how policies designed to ensure that all persons are treated the same regardless of race may exacerbate inequities.

Annals of Internal Medicine is the premier internal medicine academic journal published by the American College of Physicians (ACP). It is one of the most widely cited and influential specialty medical journals in the world.


Winning Abstracts

Validation of F3ALLS Assessment in Older Adults

Falls are one of the most common healthcare conditions that affect older adults today. The WHO estimates 28-35% of people ages 65 or older fall each year (1). There is compelling evidence from meta-analyses that exercise and individually tailored multifactorial interventions can reduce falls among community dwelling older adults (2).

Want to have your abstract featured here? ACP holds a National Abstracts Competition as part of the ACP Internal Medicine Meeting every year. Find out more at ACP Online.


Subspecialty and Combined Training Careers

Adolescent Medicine

Adolescent medicine focuses on the physical, psychological, social, and sexual development of adolescents and young adults. Adolescent medicine involves understanding the unique medical and behavioral issues associated with this patient population, and may include preventive, acute, and chronic care of these individuals.

See all the career pathways open to internal medicine doctors and explore a “day-in-the-life” of an IM specialist/subspecialist at the bottom of our “Medical Student Career Path page.


In the Clinic

Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea and chlamydia rates have risen to record-high levels in the United States over the past decade. Because these infections are often asymptomatic, effective clinical management relies on screening of asymptomatic patients, particularly women younger than 25 years and men who have sex with men.


Get Involved

Register for Internal Medicine Meeting 2022: April 28-30, 2022

A special Medical Student track will be available at Internal Medicine Meeting 2022 in Chicago, IL, with valuable educational programming designed to help you prepare personally and professionally for your career in medicine. The Medical Student sessions will be available exclusively for in-person attendees. Select Medical Student session recordings will be available for 30 days after the event. See more.


2022 ACP National Abstract Competitions – Deadline November 30

The College sponsors abstract competitions with special categories for student members. Prizes include monetary awards and recognition among your peers. The medical student clinical vignette and research deadline is Tuesday, November 30, 2021. See more.


IMIG Event Inspiration

Resident Question and Answer Session

Tennessee Health Science Center held a resident Q&A in November 2020 with a panel of five IM residents representing all program years.


Chapter Chatter

Vermont ACP Chapter's Green Mountain Medicine Podcast

Green Mountain Medicine is an original podcast series from the Vermont ACP Chapter “for all things Internal Medicine” and was introduced in 2019. Hosted by the Vermont ACP Chapter medical student members, Matthew Tsai and Dylan Koundakjian, this podcast deconstructs topics that impact the field and characterize the practice of medicine. The hosts interview Vermont ACP members with expertise in the areas of discussion. Topics are intended to engage and educate ACP members at all levels–from medical student to Master–and have included opioid management, the controversy around scoring of the USMLE Step 2 exam, an update about the internal medicine residency program at the University of Vermont Medical Center, women in medicine, and “what's new” at the Vermont Chapter of the ACP. Listen.


MKSAP 19

“Quiz Me!” Question

Test your medical knowledge each month with questions from The Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program® (MKSAP).

A 28-year-old woman is evaluated in the emergency department for an episode of syncope. Before the syncopal event, she was standing motionless in a warm environment for several minutes, and then she felt warm, dizzy, and nauseated. She lost consciousness for less than 30 seconds. She experienced no trauma during the event and had no confusion afterward. She has previously experienced presyncope at work while standing for long periods of time but had never lost consciousness. She has no medical problems and takes no medications.

The Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program® (MKSAP) has been the “go-to” resource for board prep and lifelong learning since 1967. Learn more.


Top

ACP IMpact is copyrighted ©2021 by the American College of Physicians.