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Annals of Internal Medicine In the Clinic

In the Clinic is a monthly feature in Annals of Internal Medicine introduced in January 2007 that focuses on practical management of patients with common clinical conditions. It offers evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions about screening, prevention, diagnosis, therapy, and patient education and provides physicians with tools to improve the quality of care.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by painful, swollen joints that can severely impair physical function and quality of life. The presenting symptoms of musculoskeletal pain, swelling, and stiffness are common in clinical practice, so familiarity with diagnosing and managing RA is crucial. Patients with RA are at greater risk for serious infection, respiratory disease, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and mortality than the general population. In recent years, early diagnosis, aggressive treatment, and expanded therapeutic options of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have markedly improved both the management and long-term prognosis of RA.

To read this issue of In the Clinic, please click here. All ACP members have full access to this content.

Fall Prevention in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

Falls are common among older adults. One in 3 adults aged 65 years or older and 1 in 2 adults aged 80 years or older fall each year. Interventions for prevention have been identified; however, they are often not addressed in primary care practice. Screening all older adults annually for falls can identify who will benefit from further clinical evaluation and management. Falls and the need for care from subsequent injury increase with age. They adversely affect quality of life and are a financial burden on the health care industry. As a result, risk reduction is a key focus of prevention efforts, even among very elderly persons.

To read this issue of In the Clinic, please click here. All ACP members have full access to this content.

Back to the January 2019 issue of ACP International