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FOR THE PRESS

18 July 2000 Annals of Internal Medicine Tip Sheet

Annals of Internal Medicine is published by the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (ACP-ASIM), an organization of more than 115,000 physicians trained in internal medicine. The following highlights are not intended to substitute for articles as sources of information. For an embargoed fax of an article, call 1-800-523-1546, ext. 2656 or 215-351-2656. Full content of the issue will be available on the Internet at www.annals.org on June 20, 2000.

Study Finds "Nontraditional" Risk Factors for Heart Disease in Diabetics

A prospective study of 1,676 adults with type 2 diabetes but no history of coronary heart disease (CHD), found that, in addition to known risk factors for CHD, in people with diabetes, CHD was also significantly associated with levels of blood proteins albumin, fibrinogen, factor VIII and Von Willebrand's factor (Article, p. 81). An editorial notes that the next step is to learn whether treating or modifying these factors will reduce heart disease (Editorial, p. 154).

Women Internists Earn Significantly Less Than Male Internists

A study of internists in Pennsylvania found that male internists earned 14 percent more per hour, even when data were adjusted for variables such as specialty, training, number of hours worked and practice setting (Article, p. 104). Some earlier studies had indicated that the gender gap in physicians' earnings was disappearing.

Small Women Have Increased Risk for Fractures

A prospective study of 8,059 women found that low body weight was associated with increased risk for fractures of the hip, pelvis and rib, but not fractures of the elbow, wrist, ankle or foot (Brief Communications, p. 123). Authors say that, when bone mineral density has not been measured, body weight is useful in predicting fractures.

Antibiotic Use and Misuse Fueled as Much by Culture and Economics as Medical Need

(Academia and Clinic, p. 128.)


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