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FOR THE PRESS

5 January 1999 Annals of Internal Medicine Tip Sheet

Annals of Internal Medicine is published by the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (ACP-ASIM), an organization of more than 115,000 physicians trained in internal medicine.

MAKE THE FIRST AND THIRD TUESDAYS ANNALS NEWS DAYS!

Annals of Internal Medicine is Now Published on the First and Third Tuesdays of the Month

French Surgeon Likely To Have Transmitted HIV to Patient, Study Finds

A study of 983 former patients of an HIV-infected orthopedic surgeon practicing in Paris concluded that the surgeon may have transmitted HIV to one of his patients during surgery in 1992 (Article, p. 1). An editorial says that this second plausible reported example of provider-to-patient HIV transmission reinforces six principles to minimize risk for HIV infection in medical practice (Editorial, p. 64).


Medical Students Often Exposed to Blood, Despite Intensive Training

A study found that in a seven-year period, 11.7 percent of a university's medical students reported potentially infectious exposure to blood, even though the university trained students to handle blood safely and had set up a hot line to report injuries (Academia and Clinic, p. 45). An editorial shows how medical training differs from training for law, business or government and points out that exposure to blood is only one of the physical and psychological risks medical students face (Editorial, p. 66).


'Athlete's Heart' Probably Not Heart Disease in Highly Trained Athletes (Article, p. 23.)


Viral Load Testing Should Not Be Used to Make the Initial Diagnosis of HIV Because of Potential False Positives (Brief Communication, p. 37.)


Chellation Therapy to Remove Lead Seems to Slow Existing Kidney Disease (Article, p. 7)


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