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FOR THE PRESS

2 May 2000 Annals of Internal Medicine Tip Sheet

Annals of Internal Medicine is published by the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (ACP-ASIM), an organization of more than 115,000 physicians trained in internal medicine. The following highlights are not intended to substitute for articles as sources of information. For an embargoed fax of an article, call 1-800-523-1546, ext. 2656 or 215-351-2656. Full content of the issue will be available on the Internet at www.acponline.org on May 2, 2000. NOTE: Annals will open its new Web site, annals.org, in May. We're arranging for our reporters to access embargoed articles prior to publication. Watch for details.

ACP-ASIM Guidelines for Drug Treatment of Depression:

Older and Newer Antidepressants Both Good

St. John's Wort May Help Mild Depression

Overweight Women Less Likely To Be Screened for Two Cancers

A population-based study of 11,435 women found that overweight and obese women were less likely to be screened for cervical and breast cancer with Pap smears and mammography, even after adjustment for other known barriers to care (Article, p. 697). Since obese women have higher mortality rates for breast and cervical cancer than do thinner women, the researchers say they should be targeted for more screening. An editorial says that screening 100 percent of all women may not be the 'right' cancer screening rate (Editorial, p. 732). Communication about screening may be a better indicator, the writer says.

Some Marathon Runners Developed Deadly Blood and Brain Condition

Seven runners who collapsed after competing in a marathon were found to have pulmonary edema, or fluid in the lungs, and hyponatremic encephalopathy, a condition in which the brain swells because of low salt levels in the blood. One runner died; the others were successfully treated with intravenous salt solution.


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