All You Need to Know about Adult Medicine is at Internal Medicine 2011

From Immunization Recommendations to HIV
Therapy to How Health Care Reform will affect
Patient
s, Internal Medicine 2011 Provides Many
Story Opportunities for Journalists

MEDIA
CONTACTS

Steve Majewski
E-mail
215-351-2514

Laura Baldwin
E-mail
215-351-2668

ADDITIONAL
RESOURCES

Press Registration

Course Finder


Daily Planner

Awards and Convocation

Richard Baron, MD, MACP
Opening Ceremony Speaker


Herbert S. Waxman Clinical Skills Center

What is a Doctor of Internal Medicine?

ACP Fact Sheet

ACP Media Policy

 

PHILADELPHIA, March 8, 2011 -- More than 5,000 internists (adult medicine specialists), subspecialists, medical students, and allied health professionals will meet in San Diego for Internal Medicine 2011, the annual scientific meeting of the American College of Physicians (ACP), April 7 - 9 (Thursday - Saturday), at the San Diego Convention Center.

ACP is the largest specialty organization devoted to adult medicine and is the second-largest physician group in the United States. Internists specialize in the prevention, detection, and treatment of illnesses in adults.

Internal Medicine 2011 features more than 260 scientific sessions taught by nationally recognized physicians. Topics and events that provide interesting story angles are below.

At the Opening Ceremony on April 7 at 9:30 a.m., Richard Baron, MD, MACP, will deliver the keynote address, “Medicine as Practice.”  Bringing together a historical perspective with that of a 21st century patient-centered medical home, Dr. Baron will reflect on the continuities and changes in medical practice as an activity. A past chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Baron was named the 2010 "Practitioner of the Year" by the Philadelphia County Medical Society.

PHILADELPHIA, March 8, 2011 -- More than 5,000 internists (adult medicine specialists), subspecialists, medical students, and allied health professionals will meet in
San Diego for Internal Medicine 2011, the annual scientific meeting of the American College of Physicians (ACP),
April 7 - 9 (Thursday - Saturday), at the San Diego Convention Center.

cono2011

ACP is the largest specialty organization devoted to adult medicine and is the second-largest physician group in the United States. Internists specialize in the prevention, detection, and treatment of illnesses in adults.

Internal Medicine 2011 features more than 260 scientific sessions taught by nationally recognized physicians. Topics and events that provide interesting story angles are below.

At the Opening Ceremony on April 7 at 9:30 a.m., Richard Baron, MD, MACP, will deliver the keynote address, “Medicine as Practice.”  Bringing together a historical perspective with that of a 21st century patient-centered medical home, Dr. Baron will reflect on the continuities and changes in medical practice as an activity. A past chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Baron was named the 2010 "Practitioner of the Year" by the Philadelphia County Medical Society.


Sample Internal Medicine 2011 Topics

Vaccines: Not Just for Kids
: Learn what vaccines are currently recommended for adolescents and adults, what new vaccines are in the pipeline for prevention of infectious diseases, and the strategies for communicating information regarding vaccines to the public.

News You Can Use: Advice on High-Value, Cost-Conscious Care: Learn how to assess the benefits, harms, and costs of an intervention to understand its value, how to determine what medical interventions are of good value, and how to reduce or eliminate care that provides no benefit and may even be harmful.

Ethics Year in Review: Learn the pressing bioethical issues facing internists today and how emerging ethical issues are affecting patient care.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Show Me the Evidence: Learn which complementary and alternative medicine therapies should be incorporated into routine medical practice, which should be avoided, what interactions should physicians be aware of, and what clinical practice issues are important for patients regarding complementary and alternative medicine.

How Will Health Care Reform Affect Internists and their Patients?: An in-depth presentation on hot public policy issues related to health care reform that are of most concern to internal medicine physicians and their patients.

Headache Evaluation and Treatment: Learn the best initial treatment strategy for acute management of migraine and the best options for management of chronic daily headache.

Update in New Medications: Understand which new drugs, either in the pipeline or recently approved by the FDA, work by a novel mechanism. Learn the comparative efficacy and adverse reactions for new medications and how they differ from existing drugs for the same indication. Learn which new practice guidelines and systematic reviews address pharmacotherapy for chronic illnesses.

Top Ten Medication Errors
: Learn the most common drug reactions encountered in general medicine practice and the systems available for anticipating drug reactions and interactions.

The Legacy of Tuskegee: Dealing with Minority Patients' Mistrust of the Health Care System: A discussion of the signs of mistrust by minority patients; how disparities can be reduced by approaches and efforts at the public and private levels by individuals, neighborhoods, nonprofits, private employers, and government agencies; how to conduct effective outreach to faith-based communities and workplaces in areas with large minority populations to define health care needs; and appropriate use of indigenous health care workers in institutions with underrepresented physician populations.

Contributions of China to Modern Medicine: A discussion of the historical and contemporary contributions of China to both the science and the practice of modern medicine, the contributions of ancient China to modern medicine, key leaders and teachers and their unique contributions, and highlights of the principles of Chinese medicine.

Evidence-based Physical Diagnosis: Learn what elements of the physical examination remain essential and accurate today and which physical findings are the most accurate in the diagnosis of pneumonia, congestive heart failure, ascites, and rotator cuff tear.

Nutritional Issues in Older Adults: Learn the common causes of weight loss in older adults, how anorexia and cachexia are best treated, what micronutrient deficiencies (e.g., vitamin B12 or vitamin D) are important in the elderly, and whether vitamin supplements help promote health or prevent disease.

History of Medicine: Bring Out Your Dead! A History of Plagues, Ancient and Modern: A discussion of how changing views of infection changed approaches to epidemics, lessons from the past that inform future approaches to epidemics, and the current factors that assist and limit effective prevention and management of epidemics.

Pharmacotherapy Practices in Type 2 Diabetes: Learn which non-insulin therapies have evidenced-based outcomes other than A1C and which characteristics make a patient ideally suited to receive each class of agent used to treat type 2 diabetes.

HIV Therapy: State of the Art: Learn the current approach to management of HIV infection and the controversies surrounding when to initiate antiretroviral therapy.

Colon Cancer: Current and Emerging Screening, Prevention, and Treatment
Strategies
: Learn the present consensus on colon cancer screening, the racial disparities in screening, and what the effective medicines for colon cancer prevention are.

Multiple Small Feedings of the Mind: Oncology, Infectious Diseases, and Hematology: Learn what an internist should advise a) a 40-year-old woman with average breast cancer risk and no prior screening and b) a woman in her 40s who has previously had normal annual screening mammograms; the evidence behind expanded indications for the HPV vaccine; the routine testing to evaluate patients newly diagnosed with HIV; and what level of anemia should erythropoietin analogues be initiated in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Multiple Small Feedings of the Mind: Cardiology, Endocrinology, and Neurology: Learn the evidence for using aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetics, which specific diabetic populations should receive aspirin, and the risks of over-supplementing vitamin D.

Is It Influenza?: Learn the current epidemiology of influenza viruses in the U.S., who should be screened for suspected influenza, the recommendations for empiric antiviral therapy for patients with suspected influenza, and the recommendations for community preparedness for pandemic influenza.

News You Can Use: Current Clinical Guidelines: A general overview of the latest clinical guidelines on COPD, inpatient glycemic control, and screening for HIV.

Neurology for the Non-Neurologist: Learn the best current approaches to stroke prevention and management, what imaging is most useful, and what is new in the evaluation and management of multiple sclerosis.

Women and Heart Disease: Learn how women differ from men in regard to risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), the risk of CHD in women with a history of preeclampsia, the normal physiology of pregnancy, and what cardiovascular diseases are associated with pregnancy.

Engaging e-Patients: How e-Messaging, Social Media, and Patient Activation Can Transform Your Practice: Learn what advanced communication and collaboration technologies in use today; the medico-legal barriers to the use of social networking (e.g., Facebook and Twitter) in patient care; how care and collaboration can be enabled using advanced technologies, such as video conferencing, web-based collaboration, social networking, PHRs, and patient websites; the limitations of current communication technologies in health care; and how social networking can benefit patients without involving physicians.

Ethical Challenges in Physician Relationships with Patients and Family Caregivers: Learn how the physician obligation to the family caregiver differs from the obligation to the patient, the physician’s responsibility to the family caregiver who desires futile care for the patient who is no longer able to communicate his or her wishes, how the treating physician can best support the patient’s family member when that person is also a physician, and the appropriate boundaries for and special needs of the physician-family caregiver.

Should Patients Have Easy Access to Doctors' Notes in the Electronic Health Record?: A Debate: In this lively debate, hear the pros and cons of patients’ access to their doctors’ notes. Patients have the right to review their doctors’ notes, but rarely do so as a matter of course. If doctors invite patients to review their visit notes, will care improve? Will patients engage more actively in their care, improve health-related behaviors, and manage illness more effectively? Or will such practice engender anxiety and misunderstanding?

How Can Primary Care and the Patient-Centered Medical Home Power the Success of U.S. Health Care Reform?: Learn why the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has emerged as such an attractive solution for health care reform, what it will take for the PCMH to realize its full potential and become successful and enduring, and the relationships between and the prospects for the following “hot topics” in health care reform: comparative effectiveness research, patient-centered outcomes research, the chronic care model, electronic medical records, pay-for-performance, and accountable care organizations.

Mars and Venus: Male and Female Sexual Health: Learn the role of erectile dysfunction drugs and the difference among them, the most frequent sexual adverse effects of common drugs and what can be done to minimize them, the different types of sexual dysfunction in women and what is the appropriate approach to diagnosis and management of female sexual dysfunction, and the sexual health issues facing those with chronic disease and disability.

Sexually Transmitted Infections: Learn the recommended approach for diagnosing and treating syphilis in patients with and without HIV co-infection, the current approach to diagnosing and treating genital herpes, and the current recommendations for treatment of urethritis and cervicitis.

Evolution of Diversity in Medicine: Learn the unique challenges minority physicians face
and what individuals can do to support minority physicians.

Internal Medicine 2011 Highlights and the final round of Doctor's Dilemma take place on April 9 at 5:15 p.m. Clinician-educators will share what they think are Internal Medicine 2011’s most important take-home messages. Then the “Final Four” teams remaining in the Doctor's Dilemma competition -- a fast-paced, Jeopardy-style medical knowledge competition among students and residents -- will face off in the championship round. The winning team takes home the Osler Cup—ACP’s coveted trophy.

About the American College of Physicians
ACP is the largest medical specialty organization and the second-largest physician group in the United States. ACP members include 130,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students. Founded in 1915 to promote the science and practice of medicine, ACP works to enhance the quality and effectiveness of health care by fostering excellence and professionalism in the practice of medicine. Follow ACP on Twitter
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.

 

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