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Governor Bio and Vision Statement

James V. Felicetta, MD, FACP

James V. Felicetta, MD, FACP started his four-year term as Governor in the Spring of 2013. As Governor, Dr. Felicetta serves as the official representative of the College for the Arizona Chapter, providing a link between members at the local level and leadership at the national level.

DATE AND PLACE OF BIRTH Seattle, Washington, March 1, 1949; EDUCATION: BS, University of Washington 1970; MD, University of Washington 1974; MHA, Seton Hall University (on-line), 2001; POST DOCTORAL TRAINING: Internal Medicine, University of Utah, 1974-1977; Endocrinology & Metabolism, University of Washington, 1977-1980; CERTIFICATION: American Board of Internal Medicine, 1978; ABIM-Endocrinology, 1981; ABIM/AAFP Geriatrics 1990-2000; American Board of Medical Management, 1991; PRESENT POSITION: Chief of Medicine, Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center, 1987-present; ACP ACTIVITIES: Member since 1980; Fellow since 1984; have attended and lectured at numerous ACP meetings in 15 states; CHAPTER INVOLVEMENT/LEADERSHIP ACTIVITIES: actively involved with educational activities; have lectured frequently on endocrine topics at regional ACP meetings; HOSPITAL/COMMUNITY SERVICE: Professor Clinical Medicine, University of Arizona; numerous committee assignments at VA Medical Center; AREAS OF PROFESSIONAL INTEREST AND EXPERTISE Cardiovascular endocrinology, including diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipid meia; author of 100+ publications in these areas

Vision Statement

If I am given the privilege of serving as ACP governor, I will work hard to strengthen our chapter and to increase its visibility significantly. I will work aggressively to increase our membership until the majority of Arizona internists, both generalists and subspecialists, are active participants in ACP activities. I will also strive to increase the number of ACP educational programs, and to increase participation by medical students, residents, and fellows. It is critical that internal medicine speak with a united voice as we enter an exceptionally hazardous era likely to include radical changes in health care delivery mechanisms. We must strengthen the “brand name” of internal medicine in this context. Our goal should be to have the general public and all relevant political and regulatory bodies understand unequivocally that internists are a very distinguished group of highly-trained experts who should be the providers of choice for most adults.